ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-140627-8
Mycobacteria Counteract a TLR-Mediated Nitrosative Defense Mechanism in a Zebrafish Infection Model
Elks, P.M., van der Vaart, M., van Hensbergen, V., Schutz, E., Redd, M.J., Murayama, E., Spaink, H.P., Meijer, A.H.
Date: 2014
Source: PLoS One   9: e100928 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Elks, Phil, Meijer, Annemarie H., Murayama, Emi, Redd, Michael, Spaink, Herman P., van der Vaart, Michiel
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified
  • Disease Models, Animal
  • Interleukin-8/metabolism
  • Mycobacterium/physiology*
  • Mycobacterium Infections/immunology
  • Mycobacterium Infections/metabolism*
  • Mycobacterium Infections/microbiology*
  • Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism
  • Neutrophils/immunology
  • Neutrophils/metabolism
  • Peroxidase/metabolism
  • Reactive Nitrogen Species/metabolism*
  • Receptors, Interleukin-1/metabolism
  • Receptors, Interleukin-8B/metabolism
  • Signal Transduction
  • Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism*
  • Tyrosine/metabolism
  • Zebrafish
PubMed: 24967596 Full text @ PLoS One
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ABSTRACT
Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), caused by the intracellular bacterial pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a major world health problem. The production of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) is a potent cytostatic and cytotoxic defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. Nevertheless, the protective role of RNS during Mtb infection remains controversial. Here we use an anti-nitrotyrosine antibody as a readout to study nitration output by the zebrafish host during early mycobacterial pathogenesis. We found that recognition of Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mtb, was sufficient to induce a nitrosative defense mechanism in a manner dependent on MyD88, the central adaptor protein in Toll like receptor (TLR) mediated pathogen recognition. However, this host response was attenuated by mycobacteria via a virulence mechanism independent of the well-characterized RD1 virulence locus. Our results indicate a mechanism of pathogenic mycobacteria to circumvent host defense in vivo. Shifting the balance of host-pathogen interactions in favor of the host by targeting this virulence mechanism may help to alleviate the problem of infection with Mtb strains that are resistant to multiple drug treatments.
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