ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-140513-325
ErbB expressing Schwann cells control lateral line progenitor cells via non-cell-autonomous regulation of Wnt/beta-catenin
Lush, M.E., Piotrowski, T.
Date: 2014
Source: eLIFE 3: e01832 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Lush, Mark E., Piotrowski, Tatjana
Keywords: glia, neuromast, stem cells
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified
  • Cell Communication*/drug effects
  • Cell Differentiation
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Fibroblast Growth Factors/metabolism
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
  • Genotype
  • Lateral Line System/cytology
  • Lateral Line System/drug effects
  • Lateral Line System/metabolism*
  • Mutation
  • Neural Stem Cells/drug effects
  • Neural Stem Cells/metabolism*
  • Neuregulins/metabolism
  • Phenotype
  • Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology
  • Receptors, Notch/metabolism
  • Schwann Cells/drug effects
  • Schwann Cells/metabolism*
  • Stem Cell Niche
  • Time Factors
  • Wnt Signaling Pathway*/drug effects
  • Zebrafish/genetics
  • Zebrafish/metabolism
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism*
  • beta Catenin/genetics
  • beta Catenin/metabolism*
PubMed: 24642408 Full text @ Elife
FIGURES
ABSTRACT
Proper orchestration of quiescence and activation of progenitor cells is crucial during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. We took advantage of the zebrafish sensory lateral line to define niche-progenitor interactions to understand how integration of diverse signaling pathways spatially and temporally regulates the coordination of these processes. Our previous studies demonstrated that Schwann cells play a crucial role in negatively regulating lateral line progenitor proliferation. Here we demonstrate that ErbB/Neuregulin signaling is not only required for Schwann cell migration but that it plays a continued role in postmigratory Schwann cells. ErbB expressing Schwann cells inhibit lateral line progenitor proliferation and differentiation through non-cell-autonomous inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Subsequent activation of Fgf signaling controls sensory organ differentiation, but not progenitor proliferation. In addition to the lateral line, these findings have important implications for understanding how niche-progenitor cells segregate interactions during development, and how they may go wrong in disease states.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONNo data available