ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-060314-9
Neurotrophin-6 is a new member of the nerve growth factor family
Götz, R., Köster, R.W., Winkler, C., Raulf, F., Lottspeich, F., Schartl, M., and Thoenen, H.
Date: 1994
Source: Nature 372(6503): 266-269 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Köster, Reinhard W., Schartl, Manfred, Winkler, Christoph
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Animals
  • Cell Division
  • Cell Line
  • Chick Embryo
  • Cloning, Molecular
  • Cyprinodontiformes/embryology
  • Cyprinodontiformes/genetics
  • Extracellular Matrix/metabolism
  • Heparin/metabolism
  • Humans
  • Mice
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Nerve Growth Factors/classification
  • Nerve Growth Factors/genetics*
  • Nerve Growth Factors/metabolism
  • Neurons/cytology
  • Protein Binding
  • Proteoglycans/metabolism
  • Rabbits
  • Recombinant Proteins
  • Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
  • Solubility
PubMed: 7969471 Full text @ Nature
ABSTRACT
During vertebrate development, many neurons depend for survival and differentiation on their target cells. The best documented mediator of such a retrograde trophic action is the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF and the other known members of the neurotrophin family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5) are conserved as distinct genes over large evolutionary distances. Here we report the cloning of neurotrophin-6 (NT-6), a new member of this family from the teleost fish Xiphophorus. NT-6 distinguishes itself from the other known neurotrophins in that it is not found as a soluble protein in the medium of producing cells. The addition of heparin (but not chondroitin) effects the release of NT-6 from cell surface and extracellular matrix molecules. Recombinant purified NT-6 has a spectrum of actions similar to NGF on chick sympathetic and sensory neurons, albeit with a lower potency. NT-6 is expressed in the embryonic valvulla cerebelli; expression persists in some adult tissues. The interaction of NT-6 with heparin-binding molecules may modulate its action in the nervous system.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONNo data available