ZFIN ID: ZDB-FIG-111007-32
Bricaud et al., 2011 - Balancing cell numbers during organogenesis: Six1a differentially affects neurons and sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Developmental Biology   357(1):191-201 Full text @ Dev. Biol.
ADDITIONAL FIGURES
PHENOTYPE:
Fish:
Knockdown Reagent:
Observed In:
Stage: Protruding-mouth

Fig. 7 The function of Six1a as a transcriptional repressor in the neuronal lineage of the developing zebrafish inner ear likely involves Hdac1 and Gro1. Loss of function of either hdac1 or gro1 leads to a decrease in number of neurons similar to that observed when six1a is over-expressed. Effects of perturbing these molecules are restricted to the neuronal lineage. Average number of hair cells and neurons in 3 dpf utricular maculae and SAG. Hair cells and neurons were detected by HCS-1 and HuC immunolabeling, respectively, using confocal microscopy. Values represent mean cell counts (± standard deviation) with a sample size of 20 for each experiment. Statistical analyses were performed for both panels with Student′s t test; all comparisons were made to embryos injected with standard MO control (STD) or with six1a mRNA. Comparisons where P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant.

Gene Expression Details No data available
Antibody Labeling Details No data available
Phenotype Details
Fish Conditions Stage Phenotype
WT + MO4-tle3b standard conditions Protruding-mouth macula utricle hair cell amount, normal
Protruding-mouth statoacoustic (VIII) ganglion neuron decreased amount, abnormal
hdac1hi1618Tg/hi1618Tg standard conditions Protruding-mouth macula utricle hair cell amount, normal
Protruding-mouth statoacoustic (VIII) ganglion neuron decreased amount, abnormal
Acknowledgments:
ZFIN wishes to thank the journal Developmental Biology for permission to reproduce figures from this article. Please note that this material may be protected by copyright.

Reprinted from Developmental Biology, 357(1), Bricaud, O., and Collazo, A., Balancing cell numbers during organogenesis: Six1a differentially affects neurons and sensory hair cells in the inner ear, 191-201, Copyright (2011) with permission from Elsevier. Full text @ Dev. Biol.