PUBLICATION

hox13 genes are required for mesoderm formation and axis elongation during early zebrafish development

Authors
Ye, Z., Kimelman, D.
ID
ZDB-PUB-201120-44
Date
2020
Source
Development (Cambridge, England)   147(22): (Journal)
Registered Authors
Kimelman, David
Keywords
Brachyury, Hox genes, Neuromesodermal progenitors, Wnt signaling
MeSH Terms
  • Animals
  • Embryo, Nonmammalian/embryology*
  • Fetal Proteins/genetics
  • Fetal Proteins/metabolism
  • Homeodomain Proteins/genetics
  • Homeodomain Proteins/metabolism*
  • Mesoderm/embryology*
  • T-Box Domain Proteins/genetics
  • T-Box Domain Proteins/metabolism
  • Transcription Factors/genetics
  • Transcription Factors/metabolism*
  • Zebrafish/embryology*
  • Zebrafish/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism*
PubMed
33154036 Full text @ Development
Abstract
The early vertebrate embryo extends from anterior to posterior due to the addition of neural and mesodermal cells from a neuromesodermal progenitor (NMp) population located at the most posterior end of the embryo. In order to produce mesoderm throughout this time, the NMps produce their own niche, which is high in Wnt and low in retinoic acid. Using a loss of function approach, we demonstrate here that the two most abundant hox13 genes in zebrafish have a novel role in providing robustness to the NMp niche by working in concert with the niche-establishing factor Brachyury to allow mesoderm formation. Mutants lacking both hoxa13b and hoxd13a in combination with reduced Brachyury activity have synergistic posterior body defects, in the strongest case producing embryos with severe mesodermal defects that phenocopy brachyury null mutants. Our results provide a new way of understanding the essential role of the hox13 genes in early vertebrate development.
Genes / Markers
Figures
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Expression
Phenotype
Mutation and Transgenics
Human Disease / Model Data
Sequence Targeting Reagents
Fish
Antibodies
Orthology
Engineered Foreign Genes
Mapping
Errata and Notes