ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-191024-6
Myomesin is part of an integrity pathway that responds to sarcomere damage and disease
Prill, K., Carlisle, C., Stannard, M., Windsor Reid, P.J., Pilgrim, D.B.
Date: 2019
Source: PLoS One   14: e0224206 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Pilgrim, David
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified/genetics
  • Animals, Genetically Modified/growth & development
  • Animals, Genetically Modified/metabolism
  • Connectin/genetics
  • Connectin/metabolism*
  • Heart/physiology*
  • Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism*
  • Muscle, Skeletal/pathology
  • Muscular Diseases/metabolism*
  • Muscular Diseases/pathology
  • Sarcomeres/metabolism*
  • Sarcomeres/pathology
  • Zebrafish/genetics
  • Zebrafish/growth & development
  • Zebrafish/metabolism*
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism*
PubMed: 31644553 Full text @ PLoS One
FIGURES
ABSTRACT
The structure and function of the sarcomere of striated muscle is well studied but the steps of sarcomere assembly and maintenance remain under-characterized. With the aid of chaperones and factors of the protein quality control system, muscle proteins can be folded and assembled into the contractile apparatus of the sarcomere. When sarcomere assembly is incomplete or the sarcomere becomes damaged, suites of chaperones and maintenance factors respond to repair the sarcomere. Here we show evidence of the importance of the M-line proteins, specifically myomesin, in the monitoring of sarcomere assembly and integrity in previously characterized zebrafish muscle mutants. We show that myomesin is one of the last proteins to be incorporated into the assembling sarcomere, and that in skeletal muscle, its incorporation requires connections with both titin and myosin. In diseased zebrafish sarcomeres, myomesin1a shows an early increase of gene expression, hours before chaperones respond to damaged muscle. We found that myomesin expression is also more specific to sarcomere damage than muscle creatine kinase, and our results and others support the use of myomesin assays as an early, specific, method of detecting muscle damage.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION