ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-181007-4
Mathematical Modeling and Analyses of Interspike-Intervals of Spontaneous Activity in Afferent Neurons of the Zebrafish Lateral Line
Song, S., Lee, J.A., Kiselev, I., Iyengar, V., Trapani, J.G., Tania, N.
Date: 2018
Source: Scientific Reports   8: 14851 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Trapani, Josef
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Action Potentials*
  • Animals
  • Lateral Line System/cytology
  • Lateral Line System/innervation*
  • Lateral Line System/physiology
  • Models, Neurological
  • Neurons, Afferent/cytology
  • Neurons, Afferent/physiology*
  • Synapses/physiology
  • Zebrafish/physiology*
PubMed: 30291277 Full text @ Sci. Rep.
ABSTRACT
Without stimuli, hair cells spontaneously release neurotransmitter leading to spontaneous generation of action potentials (spikes) in innervating afferent neurons. We analyzed spontaneous spike patterns recorded from the lateral line of zebrafish and found that distributions of interspike intervals (ISIs) either have an exponential shape or an "L" shape that is characterized by a sharp decay but wide tail. ISI data were fitted to renewal-process models that accounted for the neuron refractory periods and hair-cell synaptic release. Modeling the timing of synaptic release using a mixture of two exponential distributions yielded the best fit for our ISI data. Additionally, lateral line ISIs displayed positive serial correlation and appeared to exhibit switching between faster and slower modes of spike generation. This pattern contrasts with previous findings from the auditory system where ISIs tended to have negative serial correlation due to synaptic depletion. We propose that afferent neuron innervation with multiple and heterogenous hair-cells synapses, each influenced by changes in calcium domains, can serve as a mechanism for the random switching behavior. Overall, our analyses provide evidence of how physiological similarities and differences between synapses and innervation patterns in the auditory, vestibular, and lateral line systems can lead to variations in spontaneous activity.
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