ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-170928-4
Nitric oxide interacts with monoamine oxidase to modulate aggression and anxiety-like behaviour
Gutiérrez, H.C., O'Leary, A., Freudenberg, F., Fedele, G., Wilkinson, R., Markham, E., van Eeden, F., Reif, A., Norton, W.H.J.
Date: 2017
Source: European neuropsychopharmacology : the journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology   30: 30-43 (Journal)
Registered Authors: van Eeden, Freek, Wilkinson, Robert
Keywords: Aggression, Anxiety, Monoamine oxidase, Mouse, Nitric oxide, Zebrafish
MeSH Terms: none
PubMed: 28951000 Full text @ Eur Neuropsychopharmacol
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ABSTRACT
Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous neurotransmitter that has important behavioural functions in the vertebrate brain. In this study we compare the impact of decreased nitric NO signalling upon behaviour and neurobiology using both zebrafish and mouse. nitric oxide synthase mutant (nos1-/-) zebrafish show significantly reduced aggression and an increase in anxiety-like behaviour without altered production of the stress hormone cortisol. Nos1-/- mice also exhibit decreased aggression and are hyperactive in an open field test. Upon reduction of NO signalling, monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism is reduced as a consequence of decreased Monoamine oxidase activity. Treatment of nos1-/- zebrafish with the 5-HT receptor 1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT rescues aggression and some aspects of anxiety-like behaviour. Taken together, the interplay between NO and 5-HT appears to be critical to control behaviour. Our cross-species approach challenges the previous notion that reduced neuronal NOS leads to increased aggression. Rather, Nos1 knock-out can also lead to decreased aggression in some situations, a finding that may have implications for future translational research.
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