ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-151111-3
Med14 cooperates with brg1 in the differentiation of skeletogenic neural crest
Lou, X., Burrows, J.T., Scott, I.C.
Date: 2015
Source: BMC Developmental Biology   15: 41 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Burrows, Jeff, Lou, Xin, Scott, Ian
Keywords: Neural crest, Mediator complex, BAF complex, Brg1, Craniofacial defect, Med14, Jaw development
MeSH Terms:
  • Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/genetics*
  • Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism
  • Animals
  • Cell Differentiation/genetics
  • Cell Movement
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Cells, Cultured
  • Embryo, Nonmammalian/embryology
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
  • Gene Regulatory Networks/genetics
  • Jaw/embryology
  • Jaw Abnormalities/genetics
  • Maxillofacial Development/genetics*
  • Maxillofacial Development/physiology
  • Mediator Complex/genetics*
  • Mediator Complex/metabolism
  • Neural Crest/cytology*
  • Osteogenesis/genetics*
  • Osteogenesis/physiology
  • Zebrafish/embryology*
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics*
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism
PubMed: 26553192 Full text @ BMC Dev. Biol.
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ABSTRACT
An intricate gene regulatory network drives neural crest migration and differentiation. How epigenetic regulators contribute to this process is just starting to be understood.
We found that mutation of med14 or brg1 in zebrafish embryos resulted in a cluster of neural crest cell-related defects. In med14 or brg1 mutants, neural crest cells that form the jaw skeleton were specified normally and migrated to target sites. However, defects in their subsequent terminal differentiation were evident. Transplantation experiments demonstrated that med14 and brg1 are required directly in neural crest cells. Analysis of med14; brg1 double mutant embryos suggested the existence of a strong genetic interaction between members of the Mediator and BAF complexes.
These results suggest a critical role for Mediator and BAF complex function in neural crest development, and may also clarify the nature of defects in some craniofacial abnormalities.
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