ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-121206-3
Screening for Melanoma Modifiers using a Zebrafish Autochthonous Tumor Model
Iyengar, S., Houvras, Y., and Ceol, C.J.
Date: 2012
Source: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE   (69): e50086 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Ceol, Craig, Houvras, Yariv
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified
  • Melanocytes/pathology
  • Melanoma, Experimental/genetics*
  • Melanoma, Experimental/pathology*
  • Staining and Labeling/methods
  • Zebrafish
PubMed: 23183931 Full text @ J. Vis. Exp.
ABSTRACT

Genomic studies of human cancers have yielded a wealth of information about genes that are altered in tumors. A challenge arising from these studies is that many genes are altered, and it can be difficult to distinguish genetic alterations that drove tumorigenesis from that those arose incidentally during transformation. To draw this distinction it is beneficial to have an assay that can quantitatively measure the effect of an altered gene on tumor initiation and other processes that enable tumors to persist and disseminate. Here we present a rapid means to screen large numbers of candidate melanoma modifiers in zebrafish using an autochthonous tumor model that encompasses steps required for melanoma initiation and maintenance. A key reagent in this assay is the miniCoopR vector, which couples a wild-type copy of the mitfa melanocyte specification factor to a Gateway recombination cassette into which candidate melanoma genes can be recombined. The miniCoopR vector has a mitfa rescuing minigene which contains the promoter, open reading frame and 3'-untranslated region of the wild-type mitfa gene. It allows us to make constructs using full-length open reading frames of candidate melanoma modifiers. These individual clones can then be injected into single cell Tg(mitfa:BRAFV600E);p53(lf);mitfa(lf)zebrafish embryos. The miniCoopR vector gets integrated by Tol2-mediated transgenesis and rescues melanocytes. Because they are physically coupled to the mitfa rescuing minigene, candidate genes are expressed in rescued melanocytes, some of which will transform and develop into tumors. The effect of a candidate gene on melanoma initiation and melanoma cell properties can be measured using melanoma-free survival curves, invasion assays, antibody staining and transplantation assays.

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