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ZIRC
ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-120817-1
In vivo assessment of the permeability of the blood--brain barrier and blood-retinal barrier to fluorescent indoline derivatives in zebrafish
Watanabe, K., Nishimura, Y., Nomoto, T., Umemoto, N., Zhang, Z., Zhang, B., Kuroyanagi, J., Shimada, Y., Shintou, T., Okano, M., Miyazaki, T., Imamura, T., and Tanaka, T.
Date: 2012
Source: BMC Neuroscience   13(1): 101 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Tanaka, Toshio
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Acetic Acid/pharmacology
  • Animals
  • Biological Transport/drug effects
  • Biological Transport/physiology
  • Blood-Aqueous Barrier/drug effects
  • Blood-Aqueous Barrier/physiology*
  • Blood-Retinal Barrier/drug effects
  • Blood-Retinal Barrier/physiology*
  • Fluorescent Dyes/administration & dosage
  • Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry
  • Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism*
  • Indoles/administration & dosage
  • Indoles/chemistry
  • Indoles/metabolism*
  • Larva
  • Permeability/drug effects
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Zebrafish
PubMed: 22894547 Full text @ BMC Neurosci.
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ABSTRACT

Background

Successful delivery of compounds to the brain and retina is a challenge in the development of therapeutic drugs and imaging agents. This challenge arises because internalization of compounds into the brain and retina is restricted by the blood--brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retinal barrier (BRB), respectively. Simple and reliable in vivo assays are necessary to identify compounds that can easily cross the BBB and BRB.

Methods

We developed six fluorescent indoline derivatives (IDs) and examined their ability to cross the BBB and BRB in zebrafish by in vivo fluorescence imaging. These fluorescent IDs were administered to live zebrafish by immersing the zebrafish larvae at 7--8 days post fertilization in medium containing the ID, or by intracardiac injection. We also examined the effect of multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs) on the permeability of the BBB and BRB to the ID using MK571, a selective inhibitor of MRPs.

Results

The permeability of these barriers to fluorescent IDs administered by simple immersion was comparable to when administered by intracardiac injection. Thus, this finding supports the validity of drug administration by simple immersion for the assessment of BBB and BRB permeability to fluorescent IDs. Using this zebrafish model, we demonstrated that the length of the methylene chain in these fluorescent IDs significantly affected their ability to cross the BBB and BRB via MRPs.

Conclusions

We demonstrated that in vivo assessment of the permeability of the BBB and BRB to fluorescent IDs could be simply and reliably performed using zebrafish. The structure of fluorescent IDs can be flexibly modified and, thus, the permeability of the BBB and BRB to a large number of IDs can be assessed using this zebrafish-based assay. The large amount of data acquired might be useful for in silico analysis to elucidate the precise mechanisms underlying the interactions between chemical structure and the efflux transporters at the BBB and BRB. In turn, understanding these mechanisms may lead to the efficient design of compounds targeting the brain and retina.

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