ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-050920-4
Slow muscle regulates the pattern of trunk neural crest migration in zebrafish
Honjo, Y., and Eisen, J.S.
Date: 2005
Source: Development (Cambridge, England) 132(20): 4461-4470 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Eisen, Judith S., Honjo, Yasuko
Keywords: Myotome, Danio rerio, spadetail, beamter, fused somites, sonic hedgehog, sonic-you, slow muscle omitted, Smoothened, unplugged, you too, after eight, deadly seven, Notch pathway mutants
MeSH Terms: Animals; Body Patterning; Cell Movement*; Muscles/cytology*; Muscles/embryology* (all 18) expand
PubMed: 16162652 Full text @ Development
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ABSTRACT
In avians and mice, trunk neural crest migration is restricted to the anterior half of each somite. Sclerotome has been shown to play an essential role in this restriction; the potential role of other somite components in specifying neural crest migration is currently unclear. By contrast, in zebrafish trunk neural crest, migration on the medial pathway is restricted to the middle of the medial surface of each somite. Sclerotome comprises only a minor part of zebrafish somites, and the pattern of neural crest migration is established before crest cells contact sclerotome cells, suggesting other somite components regulate the pattern of zebrafish neural crest migration. Here, we use mutants to investigate which components regulate the pattern of zebrafish trunk neural crest migration on the medial pathway. The pattern of trunk neural crest migration is aberrant in spadetail mutants that have very reduced somitic mesoderm, in no tail mutants injected with spadetail morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that entirely lack somitic mesoderm and in somite segmentation mutants that have normal somite components but disrupted segment borders. Fast muscle cells appear dispensable for patterning trunk neural crest migration. However, migration is abnormal in Hedgehog signaling mutants that lack slow muscle cells, providing evidence that slow muscle cells regulate the pattern of trunk neural crest migration. Consistent with this idea, surgical removal of adaxial cells, which are slow muscle precursors, results in abnormal patterning of neural crest migration; normal patterning can be restored by replacing the ablated adaxial cells with ones transplanted from wild-type embryos.
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