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ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-140822-1
The Par-PrkC Polarity Complex Is Required for Cilia Growth in Zebrafish Photoreceptors
Krock, B.L., Perkins, B.D.
Date: 2014
Source: PLoS One 9: e104661 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Perkins, Brian
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Blotting, Western
  • Carrier Proteins/genetics
  • Carrier Proteins/metabolism*
  • Cilia/metabolism*
  • Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • In Situ Hybridization
  • Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate/cytology*
  • Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate/metabolism*
  • Zebrafish
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism*
PubMed: 25144710 Full text @ PLoS One
FIGURES
ABSTRACT
Specification and development of the apical membrane in epithelial cells requires the function of polarity proteins, including Pard3 and an atypical protein kinase C (PrkC). Many epithelial cells possess microtubule-based organelles, known as cilia, that project from their apical surface and the membrane surrounding the cilium is contiguous with the apical cell membrane. Although cilia formation in cultured cells required Pard3, the in vivo requirement for Pard3 in cilia development remains unknown. The vertebrate photoreceptor outer segment represents a highly specialized cilia structure in which to identify factors necessary for apical and ciliary membrane formation. Pard3 and PrkC localized to distinct domains within vertebrate photoreceptors. Using partial morpholino knockdown, photo-morpholinos, and pharmacological approaches, the function of Pard3 and PrkC were found to be required for the formation of both the apical and ciliary membrane of vertebrate photoreceptors. Inhibition of Pard3 or PrkC activity significantly reduced the size of photoreceptor outer segments and resulted in mislocalization of rhodopsin. Suppression of Pard3 or PrkC also led to a reduction in cilia size and cilia number in Kupffer's Vesicle, which resulted in left-right asymmetry defects. Thus, the Par-PrkC complex functions in cilia formation in vivo and this likely reflects a general role in specifying non-ciliary and ciliary compartments of the apical domain.
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