ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-180124-2
Essential Role of Nr2f Nuclear Receptors in Patterning the Vertebrate Upper Jaw
Barske, L., Rataud, P., Behizad, K., Del Rio, L., Cox, S.G., Crump, J.G.
Date: 2018
Source: Developmental Cell   44(3): 337-347.e5 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Barske, Lindsey, Crump, Gage DeKoeyer
Keywords: COUP-TF, Endothelin1, Nr2f1, Nr2f2, Nr2f5, bone, cartilage, jaw, nuclear receptor, pharyngeal arches
Microarrays: GEO:GSE101719
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Body Patterning/physiology*
  • Chondrogenesis/physiology
  • DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
  • DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism*
  • Endothelin-1/genetics
  • Endothelin-1/metabolism*
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental
  • Jaw/embryology*
  • Jaw/physiology
  • Maxilla/embryology*
  • Maxilla/physiology
  • Mutation
  • Odontogenesis/physiology
  • Signal Transduction
  • Transcription Factors/genetics
  • Transcription Factors/metabolism*
  • Zebrafish/embryology*
  • Zebrafish/physiology
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics
  • Zebrafish Proteins/metabolism*
PubMed: 29358039 Full text @ Dev. Cell
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ABSTRACT
The jaw is central to the extensive variety of feeding and predatory behaviors across vertebrates. The bones of the lower but not upper jaw form around an early-developing cartilage template. Whereas Endothelin1 patterns the lower jaw, the factors that specify upper-jaw morphology remain elusive. Here, we identify Nuclear Receptor 2f genes (Nr2fs) as enriched in and required for upper-jaw formation in zebrafish. Combinatorial loss of Nr2fs transforms maxillary components of the upper jaw into lower-jaw-like structures. Conversely, nr2f5 misexpression disrupts lower-jaw development. Genome-wide analyses reveal that Nr2fs repress mandibular gene expression and early chondrogenesis in maxillary precursors. Rescue of lower-jaw defects in endothelin1 mutants by reducing Nr2f dosage further demonstrates that Nr2f expression must be suppressed for normal lower-jaw development. We propose that Nr2fs shape the upper jaw by protecting maxillary progenitors from early chondrogenesis, thus preserving cells for later osteogenesis.
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