ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-150506-13
Non-invasive Imaging of the Innate Immune Response in a Zebrafish Larval Model of Streptococcus iniae Infection
Harvie, E.A., Huttenlocher, A.
Date: 2015
Source: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE   (98): (Journal)
Registered Authors: Huttenlocher, Anna
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified
  • Disease Models, Animal*
  • Immunity, Innate/immunology
  • Larva
  • Macrophages/immunology
  • Microinjections
  • Neutrophils/immunology
  • Streptococcal Infections/immunology*
  • Streptococcus/immunology*
  • Zebrafish/immunology*
PubMed: 25938624 Full text @ J. Vis. Exp.
ABSTRACT
The aquatic pathogen, Streptococcus iniae, is responsible for over 100 million dollars in annual losses for the aquaculture industry and is capable of causing systemic disease in both fish and humans. A better understanding of S. iniae disease pathogenesis requires an appropriate model system. The genetic tractability and the optical transparency of the early developmental stages of zebrafish allow for the generation and non-invasive imaging of transgenic lines with fluorescently tagged immune cells. The adaptive immune system is not fully functional until several weeks post fertilization, but zebrafish larvae have a conserved vertebrate innate immune system with both neutrophils and macrophages. Thus, the generation of a larval infection model allows the study of the specific contribution of innate immunity in controlling S. iniae infection. The site of microinjection will determine whether an infection is systemic or initially localized. Here, we present our protocols for otic vesicle injection of zebrafish aged 2-3 days post fertilization as well as our techniques for fluorescent confocal imaging of infection. A localized infection site allows observation of initial microbe invasion, recruitment of host cells and dissemination of infection. Our findings using the zebrafish larval model of S. iniae infection indicate that zebrafish can be used to examine the differing contributions of host neutrophils and macrophages in localized bacterial infections. In addition, we describe how photolabeling of immune cells can be used to track individual host cell fate during the course of infection.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION