ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-030319-7
Expression of Zash-1a in the postembryonic zebrafish brain allows comparison to mouse Mash1 domains
Wullimann, M.F., and Mueller, T.
Date: 2002
Source: Gene expression patterns : GEP   1(3-4): 187-192 (Journal)
Registered Authors: Mueller, Thomas, Wullimann, Mario F.
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors
  • Brain/growth & development
  • Brain/physiology*
  • DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics*
  • Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental*
  • Mice
  • Organ Specificity
  • Pituitary Gland/physiology
  • Species Specificity
  • Transcription Factors/genetics*
  • Zebrafish/growth & development*
  • Zebrafish Proteins/genetics*
PubMed: 12638130 Full text @ Gene Expr. Patterns
FIGURES
ABSTRACT
Four areas in the late embryonic murine forebrain, i.e. the subpallium (striatum), the preoptic region, the ventral thalamus, and the hypothalamus, have been described to express the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene mammalian achaete-scute homolog Mash1 (Ascl1, Mouse Genome Informatics) in a complementary fashion to another bHLH gene, neurogenin1 (ngn1) (Neurod3, Mouse Genome Informatics), which is expressed in directly adjacent forebrain regions. We report here that the four regions previously identified as subpallium, preoptic region, ventral thalamus and hypothalamus (i.e. ventral inferior lobe) in the postembryonic zebrafish brain show Zash-1a expression at 3 days postfertilization (dpf), whereas none of those areas express the bHLH gene neuroD (nrd) between 2 and 5 dpf. This indicates that two well established alternative genetic pathways involved in neurogenesis in the amniote (mammalian) brain are present in homologous phenotypic locations in the anamniote (zebrafish) brain as well and that these pathways possibly act similarly in the generation of different neuronal phenotypes (e.g. subpallial GABAergic interneurons versus pallial glutamatergic projection neurons, or dopaminergic neurons versus other neurotransmitter phenotypes). Furthermore, previous initial identification of early postembryonic brain subdivisions in the zebrafish is strongly corroborated by these expression patterns.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION