PUBLICATION

Identification and Tissue-Specific Characterization of Novel SHOX-Regulated Genes in Zebrafish Highlights SOX Family Members Among Other Genes

Authors
Hoffmann, S., Roeth, R., Diebold, S., Gogel, J., Hassel, D., Just, S., Rappold, G.A.
ID
ZDB-PUB-210616-11
Date
2021
Source
Frontiers in genetics   12: 688808 (Journal)
Registered Authors
Diebold, Sabrina, Hassel, David, Just, Steffen
Keywords
SHOX deficiency, pectoral fins, short stature, skeletal disease associations, skeletal dysplasia, zebrafish
MeSH Terms
none
PubMed
34122528 Full text @ Front Genet
Abstract
SHOX deficiency causes a spectrum of clinical phenotypes related to skeletal dysplasia and short stature, including Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis, Langer mesomelic dysplasia, Turner syndrome, and idiopathic short stature. SHOX controls chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, bone maturation, and cellular growth arrest and apoptosis via transcriptional regulation of its direct target genes NPPB, FGFR3, and CTGF. However, our understanding of SHOX-related pathways is still incomplete. To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms and to better understand the broad phenotypic spectrum of SHOX deficiency, we aimed to identify novel SHOX targets. We analyzed differentially expressed genes in SHOX-overexpressing human fibroblasts (NHDF), and confirmed the known SHOX target genes NPPB and FGFR among the most strongly regulated genes, together with 143 novel candidates. Altogether, 23 genes were selected for further validation, first by whole-body characterization in developing shox-deficient zebrafish embryos, followed by tissue-specific expression analysis in three shox-expressing zebrafish tissues: head (including brain, pharyngeal arches, eye, and olfactory epithelium), heart, and pectoral fins. Most genes were physiologically relevant in the pectoral fins, while only few genes were also significantly regulated in head and heart tissue. Interestingly, multiple sox family members (sox5, sox6, sox8, and sox18) were significantly dysregulated in shox-deficient pectoral fins together with other genes (nppa, nppc, cdkn1a, cdkn1ca, cyp26b1, and cy26c1), highlighting an important role for these genes in shox-related growth disorders. Network-based analysis integrating data from the Ingenuity pathways revealed that most of these genes act in a common network. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic pathways and molecular events leading to the clinical manifestation of SHOX deficiency.
Genes / Markers
Figures
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Expression
Phenotype
Mutation and Transgenics
Human Disease / Model Data
Sequence Targeting Reagents
Fish
Antibodies
Orthology
Engineered Foreign Genes
Mapping
Errata and Notes