PUBLICATION

Visualization of Chondrocyte Intercalation and Directional Proliferation via Zebrabow Clonal Cell Analysis in the Embryonic Meckel's Cartilage

Authors
Rochard, L.J., Ling, I.T., Kong, Y., Liao, E.C.
ID
ZDB-PUB-151112-3
Date
2015
Source
Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE   (105): e52935 (Journal)
Registered Authors
Liao, Eric
Keywords
none
MeSH Terms
  • Animals
  • Animals, Genetically Modified
  • Cartilage/cytology*
  • Cartilage/embryology
  • Cell Differentiation/physiology
  • Cell Growth Processes/physiology
  • Cell Movement/physiology
  • Chondrocytes/cytology*
  • Clone Cells
  • Mandible/cytology
  • Mandible/embryology
  • Morphogenesis/physiology
  • Neural Crest/cytology
  • Zebrafish/embryology*
  • Zebrafish/genetics
PubMed
26555721 Full text @ J. Vis. Exp.
Abstract
Development of the vertebrate craniofacial structures requires precise coordination of cell migration, proliferation, adhesion and differentiation. Patterning of the Meckel's cartilage, a first pharyngeal arch derivative, involves the migration of cranial neural crest (CNC) cells and the progressive partitioning, proliferation and organization of differentiated chondrocytes. Several studies have described CNC migration during lower jaw morphogenesis, but the details of how the chondrocytes achieve organization in the growth and extension of Meckel's cartilage remains unclear. The sox10 restricted and chemically induced Cre recombinase-mediated recombination generates permutations of distinct fluorescent proteins (RFP, YFP and CFP), thereby creating a multi-spectral labeling of progenitor cells and their progeny, reflecting distinct clonal populations. Using confocal time-lapse photography, it is possible to observe the chondrocytes behavior during the development of the zebrafish Meckel's cartilage. Multispectral cell labeling enables scientists to demonstrate extension of the Meckel's chondrocytes. During extension phase of the Meckel's cartilage, which prefigures the mandible, chondrocytes intercalate to effect extension as they stack in an organized single-cell layered row. Failure of this organized intercalating process to mediate cell extension provides the cellular mechanistic explanation for hypoplastic mandible that we observe in mandibular malformations.
Genes / Markers
Figures
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Phenotype
Mutation and Transgenics
Human Disease / Model Data
Sequence Targeting Reagents
Fish
Antibodies
Orthology
Engineered Foreign Genes
Mapping
Errata and Notes