ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-150414-5
Electroretinogram Analysis of the Visual Response in Zebrafish Larvae
Chrispell, J.D., Rebrik, T.I., Weiss, E.R.
Date: 2015
Source: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE   (97): (Journal)
Registered Authors: Chrispell, Jared
Keywords: none
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats
  • Electroretinography/methods*
  • Larva
  • Vision, Ocular/physiology*
  • Zebrafish/genetics
  • Zebrafish/physiology*
PubMed: 25867216 Full text @ J. Vis. Exp.
ABSTRACT
The electroretinogram (ERG) is a noninvasive electrophysiological method for determining retinal function. Through the placement of an electrode on the surface of the cornea, electrical activity generated in response to light can be measured and used to assess the activity of retinal cells in vivo. This manuscript describes the use of the ERG to measure visual function in zebrafish. Zebrafish have long been utilized as a model for vertebrate development due to the ease of gene suppression by morpholino oligonucleotides and pharmacological manipulation. At 5-10 dpf, only cones are functional in the larval retina. Therefore, the zebrafish, unlike other animals, is a powerful model system for the study of cone visual function in vivo. This protocol uses standard anesthesia, micromanipulation and stereomicroscopy protocols that are common in laboratories that perform zebrafish research. The outlined methods make use of standard electrophysiology equipment and a low light camera to guide the placement of the recording microelectrode onto the larval cornea. Finally, we demonstrate how a commercially available ERG stimulator/recorder originally designed for use with mice can easily be adapted for use with zebrafish. ERG of larval zebrafish provides an excellent method of assaying cone visual function in animals that have been modified by morpholino oligonucleotide injection as well as newer genome engineering techniques such as Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs), Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs), and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, all of which have greatly increased the efficiency and efficacy of gene targeting in zebrafish. In addition, we take advantage of the ability of pharmacological agents to penetrate zebrafish larvae to evaluate the molecular components that contribute to the photoresponse. This protocol outlines a setup that can be modified and used by researchers with various experimental goals.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION No data available