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ZFIN ID: ZDB-PUB-120702-25
Do muscle founder cells exist in vertebrates?
Powell, G.T., and Wright, G.J.
Date: 2012
Source: Trends in cell biology   22(8): 391-396 (Other)
Registered Authors: Powell, Gareth, Wright, Gavin J.
Keywords: myocyte fusion, founder cells, cell surface receptors, zebrafish, Drosophilia, mouse, jamb, jamc, kirrel, dock1, rac
MeSH Terms:
  • Animals
  • Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism
  • Cell Fusion
  • Cytoplasm/metabolism
  • Humans
  • Muscle, Skeletal/cytology*
  • Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism
  • Phenotype
  • Vertebrates*/metabolism
PubMed: 22710008 Full text @ Trends Cell Biol.
ABSTRACT

Skeletal muscle is formed by the iterative fusion of precursor cells (myocytes) into long multinuclear fibres. Extensive studies of fusion in Drosophila embryos have lead to a paradigm in which myoblasts are divided into two distinct subtypes – founder and fusion-competent myoblasts (FCMs) – that can fuse to each other, but not among themselves. Only founder cells can direct the formation of muscle fibres, while FCMs act as a cellular substrate. Recent studies in zebrafish and mice have demonstrated conservation of the molecules originally identified in Drosophila, but an important question remains: is vertebrate fusion regulated by specifying myocyte subtypes? Stated simply: do vertebrate founder cells exist? In light of recent findings, we argue that a different regulatory mechanism has evolved in vertebrates.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION No data available
ERRATA and NOTES
Opinion.